Category Archives: newspapers

Law and Media Round Up – 29 April 2013

The biggest news of the week is that the Defamation Bill received Royal Assent and is now the Defamation Act 2013, three years after the publication of Lord Lester’s original Defamation Bill. Inforrm reported the news and context here; a … Continue reading

Posted in defamation, journalism, media law mop-up, media regulation, newspapers | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

Rudyard Kipling and the media: ‘Tell it to the public press / And we will do the rest’

A recently discovered poem by Rudyard Kipling, written in 1899, fits the current Leveson/press regulation theme quite neatly – it voices the poet’s frustrations with media questions, opening “Why don’t you write a play – / Why don’t you cut your hair?“. … Continue reading

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Mark Thompson, the legal letter, and the Savile investigation

Stewart Purvis, professor of television journalism at City University London (formerly of ITN and Ofcom) has been carefully tracking the detail around ex-BBC director-general Mark Thompson’s legal interaction with the Sunday Times, following the newspaper’s questions about the BBC’s handling … Continue reading

Posted in blogging, broadcasting, defamation, journalism, media ethics, media law, newspapers | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Law and Media Round Up – 22 October 2012

Belatedly cross-posting from Monday… The Jimmy Savile scandal continues to dominate news headlines, with focus on the BBC’s decision to drop its Newsnight film. Reports in the The Times (£), Channel 4, the Independent and elsewhere quote internal emails between … Continue reading

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Gideon Benaim: Payments for private information and the regulation of journalism

Gideon Benaim, partner at Michael Simkins LLP (formerly of Schillings), has responded to my question about the potential regulation of payments for private information, in a blog post for Inforrm. He argues that “unless there is a legitimate public interest … Continue reading

Posted in blogging, digital open justice, journalism, media ethics, media law, media regulation, newspapers, press freedom, privacy, public interest | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Leveson’s Legacy: Beyond dusty tomes and 21st century buzzwords

This post first appeared on the Center for Global Communication Studies blog, at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania.  “The one thing I am determined not to do is to produce a document which simply sits on the … Continue reading

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Reporting privacy injunctions: a response from Gideon Benaim

I recently asked a couple of questions about reporting anonymised privacy injunctions, following a piece by Gideon Benaim in the Guardian. Benaim, a partner at Michael Simkins LLP, has responded with a full blog post response, which is published on Inforrm … Continue reading

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Analysis: Privacy cases re-visited, a year on from Super Injunction Spring – Judith Townend

Inforrm's Blog A year on from the introduction of the Master of the Rolls’ Practice Guidance, six privacy injunctions have been discharged, but with the claimant’s anonymity maintained in each case. The British media, however, hasn’t had much to say. … Continue reading

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News – Lord Hunt: Journalism is already ‘subject to the most extensive legal inhibitions, guidance and codes’

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Posted in journalism, leveson inquiry, media ethics, media law, media regulation, newspapers, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Open Justice Week: Scottish court refuses permission to tweet; English High Court allows media access to phone hacking court documents

A quick update on recent open justice themed developments. The Open Justice UK group has been refused permission to live tweet a case in Scotland, as Cristiana Theodoli (@_cric) explains here. While journalists have applied to tweet and tweeting was … Continue reading

Posted in courts, digital open justice, leveson inquiry, media ethics, media law, newspapers, phone hacking, public interest | Tagged , , , , , , , | 2 Comments