Category Archives: human rights

Upcoming JUSTICE event: Life and law online – defamation, freedom of expression and the web

Meeja Law is pleased to be supporting JUSTICE’s upcoming defamation and freedom of expression event on 20 November 2012. JUSTICE, a law reform and human rights charitable organisation, will be exploring  developments in libel, privacy and freedom of expression online … Continue reading

Posted in blogging, defamation, events, freedom of expression, human rights, media law, promotion | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

How should privacy injunctions be reported?

The recommended procedure and law around privacy injunctions “isn’t quite fit for purpose” according to Gideon Benaim, a partner at Michael Simkins LLP (formerly of Schillings), writing in the Guardian today. Comments seem to be closed on the piece so … Continue reading

Posted in comment, freedom of expression, human rights, journalism, leveson inquiry, media ethics, media law, press freedom, privacy, public interest, super injunctions | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

OFT closes investigation into whether companies using threats of defamation action “to quell legitimate criticism online”

The Office of Fair Trading has closed an investigation into “whether a group of companies, and solicitors acting on their behalf, were using threats of defamation action to quell legitimate criticism online”.  It was examining whether that had been an … Continue reading

Posted in defamation, freedom of expression, human rights, media law, public interest | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Should judges blog? A little more detail on the new guidance

The Senior Presiding Judge and the Senior President of Tribunals has issued new guidance [PDF] to all courts and tribunal judicial office holders in England and Wales. While it does not entirely prohibit blogging and social media use, it states: … Continue reading

Posted in blogging, courts, digital open justice, freedom of expression, human rights, media law, public interest, social media | Tagged , , | 5 Comments

Damian Radcliffe: Hey! Regulator! Leave those Hyperlocals alone!

Damian Radcliffe conducted the UK’s first review of hyperlocal media, published by NESTA in March 2012, which touched on some of the legal and regulatory issues for small local websites. He has now returned to regulation and law in more … Continue reading

Posted in blogging, freedom of expression, human rights, hyperlocal publishing, media law, media law resources, media regulation | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

An elephant in courtroom 73? Social media, regulation and the law

Lord Justice Leveson’s enormous task is to examine the culture, practices and ethics of the media, with a special emphasis on the “press”. This is because it was serious concerns about the behaviour of UK national newspapers that instigated the … Continue reading

Posted in blogging, comment, contempt of court, courts, data protection, defamation, freedom of expression, human rights, journalism, leveson inquiry, media ethics, media law, media regulation, social media, social networking | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

New event, 22 October: Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism workshop on use of drones in news gathering and event coverage

‘Drone journalism’ is coming to the UK, in perhaps the first event of its kind in Europe (the US is already ahead on this one, with the creation of the Drone Journalism Lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s College of … Continue reading

Posted in events, freedom of expression, human rights, journalism, media ethics, media law, media regulation, press freedom, public interest | Tagged , | Leave a comment

MediaAct: a new platform and network for media accountability?

On Friday and Saturday (27-28 July) I joined a group of European media bloggers in Bristol for a seminar organised by MediaWise, the EU MediaAct project at UWE and the NUJ New Media Industrial Council. MediaAcT is a European research … Continue reading

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Employment tribunals and closed material proceedings

By Lawrence McNamara With the Justice and Security Bill due soon, some interesting issues are arising around the use of closed material proceedings in Employment Tribunals. Under Rule 54 of the regulations that govern procedure, closed proceedings and the exclusion … Continue reading

Posted in academic research, courts, freedom of expression, guest post, human rights, media law, public interest, reporting restrictions | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Miscarriages of justice – ‘a bit 1980s’? No longer teatime telly but the issue lives on

Investigative journalists are no longer given adequate airtime or resources to dig up miscarriages of justice, according to a new publication by The Justice Gap. The collection of essays by lawyers, journalists, academics and campaigners launched at an event at … Continue reading

Posted in courts, digital open justice, events, human rights, press freedom, public interest | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment