Media law mop up: Parliamentary satire; super injunction data; Morgan and Mills

It may be August, but there’s still lots of serious media law news to digest. And also some sillier stuff. Like English parliamentary rules. A send-up by the Daily Show’s Jon Stewart was banned from broadcast in the UK because it uses Parliamentary footage for satirical purposes. He responds here (where you can also watch the clip). Channel 4 explained on Twitter:

We are prevented by parliamentary rules from broadcasting parliamentary proceedings in a comedic or satrical context.

More on the rules for televising Parliament here (HT: Helen Lewis-Hasteley and @fiatpanda).

Super injunctions, remember them? Well, the Guardian has put together some useful data on them here, for download by all. Sources include Inforrm, which has its own table here, Bailii and the excellent RPC Privacy Blog. Lord Neuberger, meanwhile, has issued new practice guidance for interim non-disclosure injunctions and announced an injunction data collection pilot. More on that next week.

Phone hacking

Privacy injunctions

Media ethics

Media regulation

Libel

Contempt of Court

Internet regulation

Press freedom

Court reporting

Law blogging

Jobs

Got a question?

In the autumn, Meeja Law plans to run a series of ‘Media law surgery’ posts and will put online writers’ legal questions to various experts. If you’’ve got a question, please leave it in the comments here, or drop a line tojt.townend@gmail.com.

Want to contribute to Meeja Law?

Meeja Law would love to host guest articles by journalists / lawyers / students – or anyone with an interest in media law and ethics. If you’re interested please get in touch.

You can find a full stream of aggregated media law news via @medialawUK on Twitter; and Meeja Law tweets go out via @meejalaw. Please contact me via @jtownend or jt.townend [at] gmail.com with ideas, tips and event notifications. Relevant journalism and law events here: https://meejalaw.com/events/.

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