Media law mop up: Hackgate the movie; courts data contracts; Mensch / Morgan spat

Interwoven in the phone hacking tapestry are numerous rivalries, arguments and personal battles. Louise Mensch MP and Piers Morgan ended up fighting it out on CNN last week, with Lord Sugar having his say too. BBC business correspondent Robert Peston has used Twitter to hit back at claims made by the New York Times.

If Phone Hacking the Movie does ever get made, there wouldn’t be room for all the plot threads. In the meantime, here’s a hypothetical trailer:

On Meeja Law, Barry Turner argued why he thinks more regulation won’t prevent the next phone hacking scandal. This post explained the relevance of Operation Motorman. We also delved into courts data, revealing two government contracts controlling the release of judgment and court listing information. A follow up post looked at the Ministry of Justice’s new(ish) site. Finally, I helped the Inforrm blog put together the latest version of its case tables.

Meeja Law is having some server issues this weekend – sorry if you haven’t been able to access content. Everything should be back to normal by Monday morning.

Phone hacking

Libel

Press regulation

Privacy

Court reporting

Contempt of Court

Freedom of Information

Got a question?

Meeja Law is planning to run a series of ‘Media law surgery’ posts and will put online writers’ legal questions to various experts. If you’ve got a question, please leave it in the comments here, or drop a line to jt.townend@gmail.com.

Want to contribute to Meeja Law?

Meeja Law would love to host guest articles by journalists / lawyers / students – or anyone with an interest in media law and ethics. If you’re interested please get in touch.

You can find a full stream of aggregated media law news via @medialawUK on Twitter; and Meeja Law tweets go out via @meejalaw. Please contact me via @jtownend or jt.townend [at] gmail.com with ideas, tips and event notifications. Relevant journalism and law events here: https://meejalaw.com/events/.

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