Monthly Archives: August 2012

Judicial Office responds to FoI request on blogging guidance for judges

Earlier this month, I reported that the Senior Presiding Judge and the Senior President of Tribunals has issued new guidance [PDF] to all courts and tribunal judicial office holders in England and Wales. While it does not entirely prohibit blogging … Continue reading

Posted in blogging, courts, digital open justice, media law, social media, social networking | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Damian Carney: Media Accountability after the Phone Hacking Inquiry

Dr Damian Carney proposes the setting up of a new regulatory body for the press providing strong remedies for complainants, better internal controls on ethics and complaints – and enough independence from government and industry to appease the general public … Continue reading

Posted in academic research, comment, defamation, guest post, journalism, leveson inquiry, media ethics, media law, phone hacking | Tagged , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Law and Media Mid-Summer Round Up – 29 August 2012

Originally posted on Inforrm's Blog:
Parliamentarians are still in recess, Lord Justice Leveson has finished taking evidence for Part 1 of his Inquiry, the Michaelmas legal term has not yet begun, but there have been more than enough media…

Posted in data protection, defamation, leveson inquiry, media ethics, media law, media law mop-up, media law resources, media regulation, press freedom, privacy, public interest, social media | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Sketches from Leveson

Drawing in the courtroom is prohibited under s41 of the Criminal Justice Act 1925, so broadcasters and newspapers use pastel sketches by talented and specialist artists who draw from memory outside the courtroom. This restriction does not apply to hearings in the Supreme … Continue reading

Posted in blogging, courts, digital open justice, leveson inquiry, media ethics, reporting restrictions | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

OFT closes investigation into whether companies using threats of defamation action “to quell legitimate criticism online”

The Office of Fair Trading has closed an investigation into “whether a group of companies, and solicitors acting on their behalf, were using threats of defamation action to quell legitimate criticism online”.  It was examining whether that had been an … Continue reading

Posted in defamation, freedom of expression, human rights, media law, public interest | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Should judges blog? A little more detail on the new guidance

The Senior Presiding Judge and the Senior President of Tribunals has issued new guidance [PDF] to all courts and tribunal judicial office holders in England and Wales. While it does not entirely prohibit blogging and social media use, it states: … Continue reading

Posted in blogging, courts, digital open justice, freedom of expression, human rights, media law, public interest, social media | Tagged , , | 5 Comments

Damian Radcliffe: Hey! Regulator! Leave those Hyperlocals alone!

Damian Radcliffe conducted the UK’s first review of hyperlocal media, published by NESTA in March 2012, which touched on some of the legal and regulatory issues for small local websites. He has now returned to regulation and law in more … Continue reading

Posted in blogging, freedom of expression, human rights, hyperlocal publishing, media law, media law resources, media regulation | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

An elephant in courtroom 73? Social media, regulation and the law

Lord Justice Leveson’s enormous task is to examine the culture, practices and ethics of the media, with a special emphasis on the “press”. This is because it was serious concerns about the behaviour of UK national newspapers that instigated the … Continue reading

Posted in blogging, comment, contempt of court, courts, data protection, defamation, freedom of expression, human rights, journalism, leveson inquiry, media ethics, media law, media regulation, social media, social networking | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

Analysis: Privacy cases re-visited, a year on from Super Injunction Spring – Judith Townend

Originally posted on Inforrm's Blog:
A year on from the introduction of the Master of the Rolls’ Practice Guidance, six privacy injunctions have been discharged, but with the claimant’s anonymity maintained in each case. The British media, however, hasn’t…

Posted in courts, media law, newspapers, privacy, reporting restrictions, super injunctions | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Full Fact: “Open justice in this century must mean more than merely being able to walk into the courtroom”

Full Fact is a non-profit fact-checking organisation based in the UK, which has given oral and written evidence to the Leveson Inquiry. Part of its submission on ‘The internet and the Inquiry’ [PDF] concerns access to judicial information, which Full … Continue reading

Posted in comment, courts, data, digital open justice, leveson inquiry, media ethics, media law, media law resources | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment